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DIY - Kitchen Sink Faucet

by Elayne Jassey 02/11/2019

That kitchen sink faucet needed replacing for a while, but between the cost of the new faucet and the cost of paying the hourly rate of the plumber and his helper, it is still the same old faucet. It works—sort-of—at least water comes out. Then, while watching one of those shows (that is either remodeling a house to live in or to flip and make some money), you see them change out the kitchen faucet, and you say to yourself, "I can do that.” 

So, the adventure begins.

On the surface, changing out a faucet does not seem like such a challenging project. However, if you are not doing plumbing on a regular basis, it can get more complicated. The first step is that you have to buy the faucet you want that will look good. That seems simple enough, but there are holes already drilled in the sink or the countertop, so you must get a faucet that will fit those. There are two ways to size the holes: either remove the old fixture or get under the sink to measure the distance between the holes. (This is particularly important if this is an older home.) 

Now to do the work.

Removing the faucet requires crawling under the sink. 

  • First, remove all of that stuff stored under there.
  • Turn off the hot and cold water. If there are no valves under the sink, you need to find the master valve for the house. (If this is the situation, you might decide to install valves while you’re at it, but remember, you are not a plumber, so that might be biting off more than you can chew.)
  • Now you find that the drain pipes are in your way of trying to get under the sink to reach the backside. So, you decide to remove them to get around under there. Seems logical right? Unfortunately, you find that someone else that is not a plumber replaced those drain lines and did not put them back correctly so now you are going to have to replace those.
  • Back to the faucet you finally get the water lines removed and the nuts holding the faucet to the sink. (They're corroded—apparently, there had been a leak at some point). 

Following the instructions that came with the faucet, you get it attached to the sink, and it looks GREAT! Unfortunately, you go to connect the waterlines, and the ends do not match the faucet. So, you remove the waterlines from the inlet valve and head to the DIY store to find new lines that will fit. You also remember to take all of that drain pipe with you because you are going to need to replace it and make it fit correctly.

Wrap it up!

Now you have the new parts you can get the water attached and the drain pipes reconnected. The drain pipes look a lot different, but they work, and they do not leak. Congratulations to you! 

You have finally replaced that old faucet. It looks good, but bummer it took you all Saturday morning and then some. Maybe you should have paid that plumber for an hour. You could have done something more fun. Plumbing is one of those DIY things that when you do not do it all of the time, you NEVER have the correct pieces and you end up making several trips to the store. You are not alone.

The choice is yours: spend money or spend time. DIY can be satisfying or frustrating, so remember to start a project with your eyes open to what could be involved. Good luck! 

For a referral to a qualified plumber, check with your real estate professional.

About the Author

Author
Elayne Jassey

 

Your Neighborhood Expert!

Hi, I'm Elayne Jassey and in addition to my passion for real estate, I have a passion for my family, people, competitive games and Stamford! I have loved living in Stamford, Connecticut for the last 35 years. During that time I raised two daughters here and became quite involved in our local civic life. I was very active in Board of Education affairs during all the years my daughters spent in the Stamford public schools, and my early experience as a middle school teacher gave me a great appreciation for the strengths of the Stamford schools. I am currently a member of our Downtown Committee and I'm delighted to have participated in processes that have resulted in everything from encouraging the University of Connecticut to move into their new-in-town branch location, to bringing the excitement of the area's largest Thanksgiving Day Parade, complete with soaring balloons and marching bands, to town. 

I suspect the greatest joy in my professional life is that I meet and work with so many different and interesting people. I enjoy my customers and I am pleased that I build close relationships with them that I maintain for years. These relationships have resulted in a high degree of customer loyalty, and most importantly many close and rewarding friendships. In fact, I continue to work with people I listed, rented or sold properties to when I first entered the profession, and now I have begun selling to the next generation in their families! 

When not spending time with my family or savoring time with my granddaughter as she explores the world, I love to play games. Whether participating in a hard-fought game of Scrabble, playing cards or coming up with the answers in word games and puzzles, I am energized by good competition and problem-solving. In fact, I find creating a successful real estate transaction is a composite of all the things I most enjoy. It combines the problem-solving excitement of detective work with the joy of matchmaking. Each new customer presents a unique set of needs and goals, a special personality and a sense of individual style, all within clearly defined financial strictures. Understanding all these factors and fitting the pieces together successfully is the challenge that makes the selling of real estate so special to me. And it allows me to use my considerable energy, enthusiasm, and entrepreneurial spirit to work hard at meeting my own personal goals. 

People often say that I am a very lucky person. I agree. I live in a community I love. I am surrounded by family and friends, and work in a profession that still engages me deeply. And I've noticed that the harder I work, the luckier I am!